Wretched

FADE IN:

INT. UNIVERSITY CLASSROOM – DAY

PROFESSOR SMITH stands behind a table a the front of the room. The table holds papers, books, a lectern, and a small clock. The chalkboard behind him has numerous forms of Latin adjectives.

Eighteen to twenty students, some wearing pajamas, sit throughout the room. They all have books and notebooks open, though they aren’t all paying close attention

PROFESSOR SMITH
… which is why so many English words are Latin cognates. Take a look at the vocab from this chapter. What do you see that has a good English derivative?

There is a flutter as students turn pages in their books to find the right section. MAGGIE raises her hand. PROFESSOR SMITH nods his head, indicating that she can answer.

MAGGIE
Miser, misera, miserum? We get “miser” and “miserable” from it.

PROFESSOR SMITH
Yes, good. Nota Bene, though, “miserable” isn’t the best way to translate miser. “Miserable” usually has more to do with feelings – unhappiness, et cetera. The best translation of miser is “wretched” – it’s much more about extreme distress. Wretched is a great word. If you use wretched in a sentence at least once a week, you might be a classicist.

CLOSE ON MAGGIE who’s interest has been piqued.

FADE OUT

***

Wretched, adj. very unfortunate in circumstance, despicable or mean, pitiful or worthless

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